inquire-within-yourself

inquire-within-yourself:

If I had to choose one favorite scene from Season 01, it would be this one - when Joe accidentally sees Macintosh for the first time. The level of amazement / disappointment / dismay you can see on his face is almost unbearable. It’s the moment you realize there will be no happy ending for Joe.

artsfortransit
artsfortransit:

Have you noticed our newest poster in the subway system yet? Artist Jennifer Judd-McGee created the Botanical poster as a papercut, crafting a flourishing and beautiful pattern.
“A wild dance of flowers brightens the lives of riders in Jennifer Judd-McGee’s papercut, reminding us of our natural riches. See the real thing at one of the many botanical gardens and nature centers in New York City and across the MTA’s service region-many within easy reach by mass transit.”
Keep your eye out for this gem and pick up your own copy as a great holiday gift here!
 
Above: Jennifer Judd-McGee, Botanical, 2011.

artsfortransit:

Have you noticed our newest poster in the subway system yet? Artist Jennifer Judd-McGee created the Botanical poster as a papercut, crafting a flourishing and beautiful pattern.

“A wild dance of flowers brightens the lives of riders in Jennifer Judd-McGee’s papercut, reminding us of our natural riches. See the real thing at one of the many botanical gardens and nature centers in New York City and across the MTA’s service region-many within easy reach by mass transit.”

Keep your eye out for this gem and pick up your own copy as a great holiday gift here!

 

Above: Jennifer Judd-McGee, Botanical, 2011.

artsfortransit

artsfortransit:

Located at the Prince Street station on the N and R line, Carrying On, installed in 2004, is composed of almost two hundred 6-inch high silhouettes of people hauling “stuff” as they walk the city streets. Artists Janet Zweig and Edward Del Rosario worked from thousands of photographs they took of real-life New Yorkers moving in and around the city. According to the artists, the title Carrying On can be read in a variety of ways: “People on the streets of New York are almost always carrying something, sometimes something huge and outlandish… After tragedy, New Yorkers felt that they must carry on with their lives; they really do ‘carry on.’” The result is a narrative work spanning more than 200 linear feet on each side of the station, representing the diverse community that makes up our city and featuring miniature figures, each with their own quotidian story of hope and survival.  

Above:  Janet Zweig and Edward del Rosario, Carrying On. 2004.